stress

An hour with KT how can I help you further?

image.jpg

My work as a rehabilitation specialist is an important but relatively small part of health and wellness. I always try to give as much verbal advice as I can along with reading material and tonnes of motivational and moral support! But sometimes we need a little extra... Freebies anyone? ;) 

I'm offering an hour of my time throughout the months of September and October (to the first 15 people who sign up) to sit down and ask me anything about your health and wellness that you feel will support your work with me in the studio - (coffee and treats included obvs). If you are not currently a client of Precision Movement you can still book in with me - we don't discriminate here! 

All you need to do is:

1. Think of up to three topics you would like help with or would like to change. It could be a nutritional question, how to optimise your sleep, how to fit your home programme in to your life more optimally, to a new goal such as climbing Everest! 

2. Email me direct to book yourself in and list the topics you would like to chat about with me so I can prepare accordingly. 

3. Meet me at The Atrium restaurant at Grosvenor House Apartments and we'll discuss the topics and formulate a plan about how to integrate changes into your life for a healthier happier you. 

How does that sound? 

 

Contact KT direct at KT@precisionmovement and with the subject line "an hour with KT". Valid through September 1st - October 31st 2015. Appointments subject to KT's availability although we'll try to accommodate as much as possible. Appointments are non-transferable and cannot be rescheduled once booked. 

Precision Movement's hand picked specialist partners

image.jpg

At Precision Movement we often work in conjunction with medical experts and therapists to help clients get better faster.  We've hand picked specialists in orthopaedics, physiotherapy, osteopathy, specialist chiropractic, nutrition, lifestyle and stress management.  Our MO is to get you better - whatever that takes we'll make it happen.  We want our work to benefit you at the right point in your recovery so we may send you to another specialist first or in conjunction with the work we are doing.  

So here are our hand picked specialists and a bit about how they could potentially help you. Click on the links below to find out more about them and how to contact them.

 

Lucy Bransgrove

Lucy Bransgrove is a private visiting Physiotherapist who specialises in back pain and injuries as well as working at Kings College Boys School in Wimbledon as their pitchside sports physio.  Lucy provides treatment at the Precision Movement studio as part of our injury rehabilitation programme.

 

NUCCA 

Heidi Grant is a NUCCA Chiropractor and specialises in head and neck trauma as well as how the alignment of the head and cervical spine affect the whole body.  Patients range from professional athletes to those recovering from strokes, neurological disorders, chronic pain, and common injuries.  I work in conjunction with Heidi a lot to help clients hold their adjustments better.

 

London Orthopaedic clinic 

If you require more medical and invasive interventions from trauma or long term degenerative changes, Precision Movement recommends patients to The London Orthopaedic Clinic on Wimpole Street, W1.  Founded by Mr Brian Cohen, it houses a team of 14 surgeons and specialist physicians who I would trust with my life!  

 

Philip Waldman at Chelsea Natural Health 

Philip Waldman is the owner of Chelsea Natural Health clinic and my personal Osteopath.  As a local practitioner to my home I am always recommending his treatment to clients if they are close by.  Many of my clients have said he has magic hands!  He is truly gifted.

 

Karen Maidment at Pure Body Balance 

Karen Maidment is a Functional Diagnostic Nutritionist and is my go-to girl for all the inner workings of the body.  Karen provides a comprehensive assessment of the digestive and hormone systems and helps you heal your insides with anti-inflammatory nutrition.  She has also written a book called Meals that Heal which I have found invaluable.  If you need any kind of nutritional support I highly recommend Karen - she does much of her work by Skype so don't let her home town of Cheltenham put you off!

 

Richard Skudder at Pure Sports Medicine in Kensington

ure Sports Med Richard Skudder is the Osteopath at Pure Sports Medicine Kensington and specialises in the biomechanical aspects of human movement, injury prevention and injury recovery.  Richard helped me overcome my elbow tendonitis last year - a great practitioner.

Avni Trevedi at Avni Touch in North London specialises in women's and paediatric healthcare.  Avni sees many women while they are trying to conceive, during their pregnancy and when the baby arrives often treats both mother and child.

 

ONYX 

Joanne Halstead is a remedial sports massage therapist working from practices in Mayfair and Shoreditch.  She works with clients who need regular release work as a result of their sports and the stresses of every day life.  Joanne comes highly recommended by me personally as I've hugely benefited from her treatments.

Fabs Massage Fabian Adami is a remedial sports massage therapist who has worked with Precision Movement clients to assist in their recovery from injury.  He often works with rugby players.  Having received treatment from him on a number of occasions I can highly recommend him.  Fabian works in Putney and also offers a mobile service - visiting you at home which comes in very handy for us time poor busy folk!

 

Fitness Adventure Travel 

Rob Tynan's company, Fitness Adventure Travel provide bespoke fitness travel life changing experiences.  I am due to lead a trip to Vietnam this year for F.A.T and I highly advocate setting yourself a challenge like this and gearing your training towards it.  Life is for enjoyment, adventure and experience, and if your training can support this then all the better!

 

Florence Parot

Florence Parot is a Sophrologist specialising in sleep and burnout.  As you know I for me sleep is an essential foundation of health and wellness. It's where we heal and recover both mentally.  For those really struggling with the quality and quantity of their sleep Florence can help you.  As a former corporate ladder climber Florence knows how burnout starts, what it feels like and how to recover from a total crash.  

 

Be Sophro 

Be Sophro is owned by Dominique Antiglio a sophorologist who specialises in birth preparation, stress management and preparation for special events.  Sophrology combines gentle movements, visualisation and meditative practices which make it a comprehensive system for mental and emotional support and rebalance.

In summary, at Precision Movement we are specialists in movement - in rehabilitation and strength conditioning.  We also highly advocate optimising all areas of your health and well-being and that's why we have picked these specialists for you should you ever need their assistance.

 

 

 

 

Precision Movement's inspiring summer book recommendations

image.jpg

As many of you will remember I set myself some pretty hefty goals this year.  One of them was to read a book a month. I haven't quite stuck to this time frame but I have read 6 books this year so far! :) 

 

I try to think of many random ways I help make life a little easier for you all. So at this critical time of year when you are packing for your vacation and you realise you haven't got a book to read on the beach I have put together a list of my top four reads from this year so far. Now you can't say I don't look out for you all... ;p Without further ado my four hand picked book recommendations for summer 2015...

 

Winning Without Losing by Martin Bjergegaard

Probably the best business book I've ever read. Martin interviewed many of the top entrepreneurs on the planet asking them how they find and maintain what he calls the new dual optimum (a fancy phrase for the more globally recognised "work/life balance"). Hugely inspiring, with some great instant take-aways and broken into manageable chunks so you can read a chapter then take a dip in the pool, read a chapter then go for lunch. I'd recommend it if you need to recharge your business brain. 

 

13 Things Mentally Strong People Don't Do by Amy Morin 

Amy has a brilliant personal story to tell about her hardships and how she overcame them by NOT doing what mentally strong people DON'T do. If you're feeling a bit beaten up right now then this is a good booster for the spirit and the soul.  

 

When I Stop Talking You'll Know I'm Dead by Jerry Wientraub 

For a lighter story that reads more like a novel try Weintraub's life story of becoming a self-made man in Hollywood. With anecdotes about Sinatra, Elvis and a host of celebrities and musicians it's an engaging and fantastical story of a man who has lived what seems like a charmed life but he's worked his absolute socks off for.  I love his chutzpah - every good business person needs that! 

 

 The Road to Character by David Brooks

This is my most recent read.  I actually went to see David being interviewed in May which was a real treat.  This book is all about cultivating the eulogy virtues. We're pretty good at the CV virtues but perhaps not so focussed on the virtues that develop our character - such as bravery, kindness and selflessness. David takes 9 inspiring people from history who have made a difference to the world with their strength of character. He explores their lives and how they developed their eulogy virtues.  It's a beautiful and humbling read - good for an ego check! 

 

For those of you who are jetting off for the summer I wish you happy travels. Be safe. Make memories. Enjoy every moment. I'll still be posting so keep reading and read a book or two - it's really good for relieving stress! 

 

How to avoid the 5 common causes of back pain

old lady stretching
old lady stretching

One of the number one questions I get asked is how to I avoid back pain?   Nearly all of us will experience back pain at some point in our lives.  But how wonderful would it be to minimise the risk of getting back pain?  Read on to find out how.....

1.  Stress

We all know too much negative stress is bad for us and some of you may know that it affects us physically.  Stress is part of our lives and it helps us achieve success and conjure bravery when we need to step up to the plate.  You have a stress threshold - a line that once crossed begins to compromise your immune system.  It slows your recovery and healing rate so normal repairs that should occur result in tissues getting left and more damaged.  This can be as small as an ulcer or a big as your back pain.  The best source of information I can give to you is about your perception of stress and I cannot say it better than Health Psychologist Kelly McGonigal in her recent TED talk.  It's 8 minutes and a revelation you will not want to miss out on. 

2.  Lack of movement

You are designed to move.  Sustained poor posture is a major cause of back pain and structural damage.  Make sure you move throughout the day.  If you are desk bound, walk around the office, take the stairs for a few flights, leave for a lunch break.  In the recent article "The making of a corporate athlete" by performance psychologists Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz that was published in the Harvard Business Review it is recommended that every person does at least 2 strength training workouts a week for endurance and to promote mental and emotional recovery.  

3.  Poor posture

Sit, stand and walk tall.  If you are exercising, exercise tall.  Another major contributor to back pain is poor posture.  If you already have back pain then poor posture will make it worse!  You may be blissfully unaware that your posture is bad but if you are currently pain free it is well worth investing the time and effort to work on your posture to minimise the risk of injuries occurring.  In this day and age, with the mountain of information and specialists to help you there is no excuse for poor posture.  Seek help.

4.  Repetitive faulty movement patterns

This is an extension of poor posture but relates more to exercising with poor form.  I have seen so many clients walk through my door who hit the gym 5 days a week but when I assess their movement patterns it is clear they do not have good technique and their movement patterns are contributing to their pain.  If you are working out in the gym and have not had any guidance at all in the past 6 months then ask a professional to look over your technique.  

5.  Poor nutritional intake

Your nutrients for every day micro damage to your body come from food.  Food provides you with the building blocks for repair, to create new cells, to strengthen your muscles, to strengthen your bones and connective tissue.  It is imperative that you take care of your nutrition and nourish your body it is as much a part of minimising the risk of injury as movement is.  

For more information on exercise for the prevention of injury and for back pain and injury recovery please email me at 

KT@precisionmovement.co.uk

.   Download my

eBook '7 steps to getting you back pain sorted'

by scrolling up and looking left!  

Featured Expert: Helen Skehan RSI physiotherapist

manual therapy
manual therapy

Helen Skehan specialises in the treatment of RSI (repetitive strain injuries).  She is the owner of

Physio Solutions

clinic in Islington, a clinic that she built herself over 16 years, houses 9 therapists and also offers massage and ergonomic assessments in the work place.  

KT:  Helen, what is RSI?

HS:  RSI stands for repetitive strain injury.  It is a term given to work related non-specific upper limb injuries and does not always mean the injury has come from repetition or is a strain.  Patients present with a number of symptoms that may not always be the same from person to person.  

KT:  What symptoms are common with RSI?

HS:  I test for many things - often clients present with varied pain in the neck, shoulder and arm, tingling ,numbness, temperature changes, swelling.  I look for specific tightness, muscular imbalance and postural misalignment.  I may also send clients to be tested by a rheumatologist to eliminate other underlying conditions.

KT:  How does RSI develop?

There are many different ways RSI can develop.  It is often a combination of a poor workstation, poor posture, lack of exercise (although not always sometimes I see patients who are real gym bunnies),not taking enough breaks at work, high stress, lots of typing and ignoring initial symptoms.  

KT:  How does stress play a part in the development of RSI? 

I would say stress exacerbates symptoms.  Mechanically, stressed induces increased muscle tension in the neck and shoulders where the nerves exit the spine and pass through the shoulder joint down the arm.    Also, breathing rate increases and during stressful times we tend to adopt a upper chest lead breathing pattern which utilises the accessory respiratory muscles surrounding the neck and shoulders.  The nerves are supposed to glide through neighbouring structures but if the muscles are contracted it can squeeze the nerves causing pain, numbness and tingling.

KT:  What is your opinion on exercise for RSI?  Does it create more strain or can it help?

HS:  I always try to get my patients to engage in some form of stretching, mobilization and exercises.  There is always a role for graded exercise in the recovery of RSI.  It is important to go by a tolerance factor - the patient should not work into areas of pain.  

KT:  What affect does posture have on the development of RSI?

HS:  Sustained postures for long periods in poor alignment are definitely not healthy and can contribute to RSI.   Typically patients that have RSI injuries have a rounded upper back, a forward head carriage and their shoulders are rotated inwards.  It is very common to find neck an shoulder stiffness as well as a lack of mobility in the upper back.  Some patients can suffer from headaches.  Even more distally you find that patients often have hamstring and calf tightness. 

KT:  What impact does modern technology like smart phones and portable laptops and tablets have on the recovery of RSI?

HS:  All these devices encourage a poor posture as you tend to look down at the device you are using.  People tend to overuse their smart phones which stresses the fingers, wrists, hands and forearms.  With tablets and laptops they can be heavy to carry around and we tend to look down when we use them which strains the upper back and neck.  

KT:  What advice can you give to people using smart phones and tablets for work?

HS:  Modern technology is improving all the time.  For smart phones you can use the voice activation system to cut down on your typing time.  Try to avoid using your phone and tablet when you travel on the tube and bus to give your hands and arms a rest.  At work place a tablet on a stand or a removable keyboard.  For laptops and desktop computers invest in an ergonomic mouse or a roller mouse that sits at the front of your keyboard. 

KT:  What are the early symptoms of RSI?

Any hand symptoms that are related to desk work including pain, muscle cramps, tingling, numbness, swelling or feeling of swelling and restricted movement.  Also be aware of any of these symptoms in the shoulder and neck area even repeated small episodes.  We should be able to function without pain.  I would recommend diarising your symptoms and check over a period of time whether the symptoms remain or get worse.  If in 10-14 days the symptoms are still there then seek treatment.  

KT:  What other advice would you give to those suffering with RSI?

HS:  For those with mild symptoms I would advise regular movement that is based on improving postural alignment and mobilising the upper back.  Backstroke can be helpful and calming to some.  Avoid cycling as the posture can encourage symptoms to get worse.  RSI is an injury that develops over time and through the continual use of bad habits.  The most important thing is educating yourself on how to minimise the risk of injury and taking responsibility for your health and wellness at work.  

For more information please visit the website at 

physiosolutions.co.uk

 or to make a booking with Helen please contact her clinic, Physio Solutions, on

0207 713 7780

.  For more information on how exercise can help you recover from RSI injury please contact me at

KT@precisionmovement.co.uk

.

5 things for back pain before you see your doctor

medium_5135695746
medium_5135695746

I see a number of people who have had no success with the long term relief of back pain by going to see their doctor.  There is a lot that can be done with injury and back pain before you seek medical treatment.  Even when you go to your doctor they recommend you exercise to relieve back pain.  What they don't specify is what exercise is best for you.   One thing is for sure, pain medication will only mask your symptoms and can make you think you are ok again until the medication wares off.  Medications also put your liver and digestive system under stress.  So what can you do to ease your back pain before going to see your doctor?

1.  Notice your pattern of pain

The more information you can gather about your patterns of pain the more likely you will notice what triggers your back pain and what exacerbates it.  Do you wake up with pain?  Does it occur later in the day?  How bad is it?  Does it decrease?  By how much?  You might find that by noticing the patterns of your pain you are able to make changes to help ease the discomfort.  

2.  Move 

Movement may seem like an unlikely remedy for a back ache but it is surprisingly effective.  The key to movement for relief of pain is doing it gently.  Walking can often provide a sense of relief (however if it makes it worse and sitting relieves it then take a rest periodically).  I recommend my clients do gentle back specific mobilizations upon waking daily to ease the back into the day.  You can download your copy of the Precision Movement Daily Mobilizations

here

.  

3.  Activate your core

If you know how to do this then focus on it by activating consciously throughout the day.  For more information see my article "Does having a strong core relieve low back pain?".  If you do not know how to do this then seek out a specialist who can teach you how.  Ultimately, if your back is aching it is telling you something is not right.  From a mechanical perspective it means certain areas of your body are taking more stress and other parts are not doing their job.  You'll need help with restoring this balance so seek out a corrective exercise specialist to help you with this.

4.  Stop, look, listen

Notice what might be causing or contributing to your back pain.  It might be the heavy boxes you moved yesterday or the position you are sitting in at work.  It may even be the exercise you are doing that makes your back pain worse.  Think broadly, it might not be a mechanical cause, pain can come from digestive issues such as food intolerance or constipation and in my clinical experience pain always gets worse when you are stressed.  Look at everything.  As obvious as it seems stop doing what you think may be causing/exacerbating the pain and see if your back calms down.  

5.  Think and take control of your thoughts

I know this sounds a little ominous but stay with me for a moment.  Sometimes people who have structural damage do not experience any pain.  It is a conundrum that puzzles medical practitioners even today.  What this really means is pain does not come solely from structural or mechanical issues or everyone who has structural damage would be in pain.  What tends to happen with pain is that we let it take control and rule our lives.  I have a wonderful client who went on a silent meditation retreat last year.  While he was sitting through a 6 hour meditation session his knee began to hurt.  His meditation teacher advised that he think on the pain and try to deconstruct it.  After some time he managed to break it down into a feeling of pressure and heat.  He changed his relationship with pain and it took his pain away.  Your brain is as adaptable as your body and it will learn what pain does for you and establish a trigger that sets it off without your conscious permission.   When you let pain take over and control you no amount of exercise and treatment will help you get better in the long term. 

Sophrology - how it helps pain & injury

image
image

This week I had the fortune to interview Dominique Antiglio, a Sophrologist and owner of BeSophro.  Formally an osteopath from Switzerland, Dominique found her patients pain was highly linked to stress and how they perceived and reacted to daily life situations.  She trained in Sophrology as a means of helping her clients further and now teaches the technique exclusively in private and group sessions here in London at 58 South Molton Street practice in Mayfair.  I have personally benefited from this amazing technique and it is a great pleasure for me to share what Dominique has to say about relaxation and how it helps your healing and recovery.

KT:  What is Sophrology?

DA:  It is a mind body transformation technique that helps you deal more effectively with daily life occurrences - ones that may ordinarily stress us out.  It is a practice based on a philosophy and can also act as a therapy as well.  It uses breathing techniques, dynamic relaxation, visualisation and gentle movements to bring about change in the body and mind and to make you consciously aware of these changes.

KT:  Who can benefit from Sophrology?

DA:  Everyone!  I mainly see three types of people.  People who are stressed out and have physical pain related to their stress such as back pain or headaches.  I also specialise in birth preparation for pregnant women.  The third type of clients I see are people who are interested in their own self-development and want to expand their awareness and reach their full potential.

KT:  Do you work with clients who have physical pain?

DA:  Yes I help clients to discover if the pain they have expresses something in their lives that needs addressing.  Often physical pain can have an emotional or stress-induced cause which results in a seemingly 'random' relapse of pain until you take the time to look deeper into why the pain is occurring.  Once we establish what may be related to their pain I help them access resources to deal with underlying issues and beliefs associated with thier discomfort.

KT:  Do you think stress contributes to physical pain?

DA:  Enormously.  More than most people think.  The slightest change in the nervous system can change your breathing and the way your brain and mind functions.  It is a cascading affect - one system will affect the next system which affects the next and somewhere in that chain is the musculoskeletal system.  I believe the body is a very subtle and sensitive machine.  When any stimulus comes our way we take a conscious decision on how to deal with it.  Sophrology gives you tools to deal with your reactions to stress and stimulus that result in a better outcome for your body and mind to minimise the chances of it affecting you physically.

KT:  How often would you advise practicing Sophrology?

DA:  If everyone in the world did 5 minutes of Sophrology the world would be a much better place!  We would all have more freedom in our lives, in our thoughts, we would make better decisions, and be happier.  For use as a therapy I would advise 3 times per week for 15 mins.  If you practice the technique more, you'll experience more of the benefits!

KT:  How long does it take to learn Sophrology?

DA:  I teach people the basic techniques in 4-5 sessions.  You could do less than this and have it serve as a one off source of relaxation but to really achieve changes that you can keep benefiting from it is worth investing the time for 4-5 sessions.

KT:  How do I learn Sophrology?

DA:  The best way to learn is from a practitioner.  It helps to have a voice guiding you through the practice until you become more familiar with it.  I allow my clients to record their sessions so they can practice alone as well.

KT:  How long do the benefits of practicing last?

DA:  The more you do the longer the affects last.  My clients say the affects can last for 1 day and up to 5 days.  The response is individual.  If you are able to get into a regular daily practice the results are ongoing.  I recommend practicing 10 minutes a day for 7 days in a row to experience changes.

KT:  What are the limits of Sophrology?

DA:  Although Sophrology incorporates gentle relaxation movements the technique does not align, stabilise or strengthen areas of weakness or poor posture that may be contributing to physical pain.  Sophrology is not analytical so for work on a deep rooted emotional trauma I would refer on to a psychologist.  The technique also does not include any touch based therapy so if you have a blocked rib or a mal-aligned neck or spine I would recommend out to a manual therapist.  Sophrology is exceptionally compatible with all therapies though and can serve as a daily tonic - a way of being present, calm and quiet.  In my practice it has worked well as part of the healing and recovery of more serious illnesses, injuries and conditions.

KT:  What is the essence of Sophrology?

DA:  It is to improve the connection of mind and body and to be present often what I refer to as connecting with yourself.

KT:  Can you share a simple technique that people can use now?

DA:  One of the basic techniques we use in Sophrology is to slow the exhalation part of breathing.  This helps to bring the body into a state of relaxation. Inhale for 3 counts then exhale for 5-7 counts.  Repeat this breathing a few times in a conscious way and then try to maintain it for 2 minutes to start feeling a change.

KT:  Where can I learn Sophrology?

DA:  I teach BeSophro classes at 58 South Molton St, Mayfair, London.  I see clients for private sessions and in groups.  My next introductory session is and costs just £10.  It is a chance to try Sophrology to see if it a technique that would work well for you and your life.  I have a taster session BeSophro Taster on 12th February 2014 and my next Short course begins on January 15th 2014.

For more information on BeSophro classes with Dominique please visit www.besophro.co.uk.  Contact 07527 587 177 and info@besophro.co.uk.

5 sources of stress that make your pain worse

stress ball
stress ball

In my

1st newsletter

where I shared the link to

Kelly McGonigal's Ted Talk

on How stress can be your friend I promised I would also share the other 5 unsuspecting sources of stress that may be compromising your health.  Although is true that your conscious perception of stressful situations can transform the outcome, there is little you can do about forms of stress you do not know about.  

Did you know that stress can come from foods, hormone imbalance, electromagnetic sources, too little or too much exercise, and temperature changes?  And did you know that all these sources of stress can contribute to a relapse of your injury, pain or discomfort?

Stress build up throughout the day

I'll use an example of how stress can build up without you even knowing.  You wake up to an alarm after a restless nights sleep. You force off your tiredness with a coffee and rush out the house because you are late.  You leave the house without a coat and it's too late to go back to get one now - you'll be cold all day.  When you get to work the computers are down  The You won't finish that proposal for a client today, you'll lose the contract and your bonus!  You have a makeshift late lunch and more coffee to stay awake.  You decide to shake off your stress by going for a run even though your back hurts and when you get home, you order a take-out and you can't wait to get the kids in bed so you can 'unwind' with a few glasses of wine before you fall asleep on the sofa in front of the TV.  Sound familiar?

Many stressors one response

What if I told you that everything in the above example stresses your body?  Think of your body having a threshold - a tolerance for all the stressful things we put it through.  What if I told you that repeating this over and over would create a build up of stress that might result in a seemingly 'random' injury or illness?  It does.  The body only has one response to stress.  It does not matter if the stressor comes from a food that you are unknowingly intolerant to or over exposure to the sun.  The body's response is to shut down so it can heal.  Repeated abuse of these systems results in tiredness, compromised immunity and suppression of healing and recovery.  This leads to discomfort, pain, injury, illness and disease.

How to combat these sources of stress...

In this blog i'll give an overview of how to combat these unsuspecting sources of stress so you can begin to change your mindset on how to deal with your discomfort, pain, injury and or illness.  As each of these subjects are pretty hefty on their own I'll be sharing information in more depth over the coming weeks.

1.  Nutrition

Eat from the earth.  Refrain from eating any foods that are packaged, processed and tampered with.  Reduce stimulants like coffee to the minimum to prevent stressing out your adrenals.  Be aware of your alcohol intake

2.  Hormonal/Adrenal

Sleep enough and rest properly.  Sleeping and rest are not the same thing!  Sleep 8 an average of 8 hours in a blacked out room in silence.  Maintain balance between work and life.  Acknowledge that you are not superman/woman and that rest is as important as action.

3.  Electromagnetic

Get enough sunlight for vitamin D but not too much - hardly a problem in the English winter months!  Eliminate all electronics from your bedroom and switch off lights at the mains.

4.  Exercise

Definitely exercise but make sure you are not overdoing it.  If you are injured seek professional help to recover effectively.  Strike a balance between healing restorative exercise like tai chi and hatha yoga and more energising forms of exercise like hitting the gym or running.

5.  Make stress your friend

If you haven't watched this video on how to make stress your friend I highly recommend it.  Kelly McGonigal says it better than I ever could.

How to make stress your friend

6.  Thermal 

This seems rather obvious but pay attention to your body temperature. Anything that keeps you too hot, burns you or adversely keeps you too cold is a stressor.  Make sure you are temperate in all situations - at home, work and when you sleep.

Lastly, this is a huge topic and I'll be covering smaller chunks in finer detail as the weeks go on so you can begin to make changes that will result in a healthier, happier pain free life!  If you have questions please email me.  

Information sourced from Paul Chek's How to Eat Move and Be Healthy book, CHEK Institute, USA.